Century of Genocide in the Americas: The residential school experience

Native Voices Presents: a film by
Rosemary Gibbons and Dax Thomas
More info:
boardingschoolhealingproject.org
Special thanks to
Dan George Family
Squamish Nation
University Heights Center, Seattle
Brocklinds Costumes, Seattle
Seattle Seaplanes
Kenmore Air, Seattle; Time Brooks
John Klockner, UW Communications Dept,
Rober Jules, Kamloops Indian Band
Lizette Peters Mission Indian Band
Shane Pointe
Kevin Ward
Natalie Gibbons
The Thomas Sisters
Blake Yaffett (Priest)
Jennifer Berg
Jonathan Tomhave
St.Marks’ Choir
Roaring Camp, Felton, CA
Anthony Chan
Chief Robert Joseph, executive director
Films + Videos
Beyond the Shadows – Gryphon Productions LTD, 1993
The Boys of St. Vincent – Dir John N. Smith; Distributor: Alliance, 1993
Where the Spirit LIves- Dir. Bruce Pittman; Canadian Broadcasting Corp., 1989
Kuper Island: Return of the Healing Circle- Gumboot Productions
They Called it Prairie Light: The Story of Chiloocco Indian School- Tsianina K Lomawaima, 1994 – University of Nebraska Press
Shingwauk’s vision: A History of Native Residential Schools – J.R. Miller, 1996 – University of Toronto Press Inc.
A National Crime: The Canadian Government and The residential School System 1897-1986 – John S. Milloy, 1999 – University of Manitoba Press
Resistance and Renewal: Surviving the Indian Residential School – Cecilia Haig-Brown, 1988 – Arsenal Pulp Press LTD.
Indian School Days – Basil H. Johnston, 1988 – University of Oklahoma Press
Out of the Depths: The Experiences of Mi’kmaw Children at the Indian Residential School at Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia – Isabell Knockwood and Gillian Thomas, 1992 – Nova Scotia Roseway Publishing
Essie’s Story: The LIfe and Legacy of a Shoshone Teacher – Ester Burnett and Sally McBeth, 1998 – University of Nebraska Press
Stolen From Our Embrace – Suzanne Fournier and Ernie Crey (out of print)-Douglas & McIntyre
No End of Grief: Indian Residential Schools in Canada – Agnes Grant (out of print)- Pemmican Publications Inc.

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What is IDLE NO MORE?

 

Idle No More is an ongoing protest movement originating among the Aboriginal peoples in Canada comprising the First NationsMetis and Inuit peoples and their non-Aboriginal supporters in Canada, and to a lesser extent, internationally. It has consisted of a number of political actions worldwide, inspired in part by the hunger strike of Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence and further coordinated via social media. A reaction to alleged abuses of indigenous treaty rights by the current federal government, the movement takes particular issue with the recent omnibus bill Bill C-45.

idle no more

Vision and goals

The founders of Idle No More have outlined the vision and goals of the movement in a January 10, 2013 press release as follows:

The Vision […] revolves around Indigenous Ways of Knowing rooted in Indigenous Sovereignty to protect water, air, land and all creation for future generations.The Conservative government bills beginning with Bill C-45 threaten Treaties and this Indigenous Vision of Sovereignty.

The Goal of the movement is education and the revitalization of Indigenous peoples through Awareness and Empowerment. IDLE NO MORE has successfully encouraged knowledge sharing of Indigenous Sovereignty and Environmental Protections.

The press release also states: “As a grassroots movement, clearly no political organization speaks for Idle No More”.[10]

Idle No More’s vision has been linked by some commentators in the press with longstanding leftist political theories of indigenism. During the protests of late 2012 and early 2013, the theoretical framework of Idle No More has been frequently articulated in the Canadian press by Pamela Palmater. Palmater has denounced what she perceives as the federal government’s “assimilationist agenda”.It has been pointed out by others that the definition of “nation” is itself problematic.

Sylvia McAdam, a co-founder of the movement, has stated that she does not condone the rail or road blockade tactics that some demonstrators have used, but has spoken in support of peaceful protest “within the legal boundaries”.[14]

 

The movement was initiated by activists Nina Wilson, Sheelah Mclean, Sylvia McAdam and Jessica Gordon in November 2012, during ateach-in at Station 20 West in Saskatoon called “Idle No More”, held in response to the Harper government‘s introduction of Bill C-45.

C-45 is a large omnibus bill implementing numerous measures, many of which activists claim weaken environmental protection laws. In particular, laws protecting all of the country’s navigable waterways were limited in scope to protect only a few waterways of practical importance for navigation. Many of the affected waterways pass through land reserved to First Nations.

Law blog writer/observer Lorraine Land,[15] and Idle No More itself,[16] have identified the following current bills as affecting natives or native sovereignty:

  • Bill C-38 (Budget Omnibus Bill #1)
  • Bill C-45 (Budget Omnibus Bill #2)
  • Bill C-27 First Nations Financial Transparency Act
  • Bill S-2 Family Homes on Reserve and Matrimonial Interests or Right Act
  • Bill S-6 First Nations Elections Act
  • Bill S-8 Safe Drinking Water for First Nations
  • Bill C-428 Indian Act Amendment and Replacement Act
  • Bill S-207 An Act to amend the Interpretation Act
  • Bill S-212 First Nations Self-Government Recognition Bill
  • “First Nations” Private Ownership Act

This led to a series of teach-ins, rallies and protests that were planned by the founders in a National Day Of Action on Dec. 10th which coincided with Amnesty Internationals Human Rights Day.These coincided with similar protests already underway in British Columbia over the Northern Gateway and Pacific Trails pipelines.

The protests were timed to coincide with the announcement that Chief Theresa Spence of Attawapiskat was launching a hunger strike (no solid foods, limited to tea, water and broth) to demand a meeting with Prime Minister Harper and the Governor General of Canada to discuss Aboriginal rights. The Assembly of First Nations then issued an open letter 16 December to Governor General David Johnston, calling for a meeting to discuss Spence’s demands. Edmonton Activist Shannon Houle donated a blog and volunteered her time on the blog which became a much needed central resource for people wanting to connect with the visions and goals of Idle No More.

Also on 17 December the Confederacy of Treaty No. 6 First Nations issued a press release saying that they did not recognize the legality of any laws passed by the Government of Canada “including but not limited to Bill C-45, which do not fulfill their constitutionally recognized and affirmed Treaty and Aboriginal rights; as well as the Crown’s legal obligations to meaningfully consult and accommodate First Nations.”

As of January 4, 2013, the main goals have been narrowed down to (1) the establishment of a Nation to Nation relationship between First Nations and the Government of Canada, rather than a relationship as defined in the Indian Act to address issues and (2) social and environmental sustainability. 

Solidarity protests

Indigenous protesters at an Idle No More event in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

The protests have also spread outside of Canada. On 27 December an online source reported that there had been 30 protests in the United States, and solidarity protests in Stockholm, Sweden, London, UK, Berlin, Germany, Auckland, New Zealand, and Cairo, Egypt. On 30 December, approximately 100 people from Walpole Island marched to Algonac, Michigan.[33][29] CBS reported that “hundreds” attended a flash mob at the Mall of America in Minneapolis, Minnesota.[34] The Twin Cities Daily Planet called it a crowd of “over a thousand” and stated that it followed another similar protest week earlier where Clyde Bellecourt was arrested, and another flash mob at the Paul Bunyan Mall in Bemidji.[35]On January 5th, the International Bridge was closed again from Mohawk protests from New York. 

Within the United States, protests have been reported in many states: Michigan, Minnesota, New York , Arizona, Colorado, Washington, D.C. and Texas…. Now all along California

 

MORE RECENTLY:

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/article/idle-no-more-sweeps-canada-and-beyond-aboriginals-say-enough-enough-146516

 

HELPFUL INFO – OTHER PERSPECTIVES:

http://www.racialicious.com/2013/01/16/idle-no-more-101/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Racialicious+(Racialicious+-+the+intersection+of+race+and+pop+culture)

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/news/idle-no-more/

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2013/01/16/canada-paul-martin-idle-no-more.html?cmp=rss&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

 

 

 

How to address a N8V

Well, let’s see here…

This has been a topic of much debate.  Here is just two links of hundreds…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_name_controversy

http://www.infoplease.com/spot/aihmterms.html

Personally, I don’t like the word – INDIAN – but that is because the stigmatism of the ‘common knowledge’ of Columbus mistaking us for people of India, though if one properly researches that information – one would find that even that ‘common knowledge’ is rumor…

Though- what is another word but an identifier…

How to identify us as a people, particularly the people who have been of the land before contact…?

I will say this – personally, I like native, indigenous, original people of the territory….. respectful words like that.  Because if you try and reference a native in a conversation as – “..that person is INDIAN..”, the individual(s) being spoken to need clarification…. American Indian or Indian of India….

Yet, here is the personal view of another Native who say’s YES calle me an INDIAN

http://www.vdare.com/articles/why-im-an-indian-not-native-american

So,

The most respectful thin you can do, when addressing a N8V, is ask.